kon-radsJust got back from a local screening of David Bowie is, which is a documentary offering a “live” tour of the exhibition originally organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum that utilizes material from Bowie’s extensive personal archive. Since closing at the V&A in August 2013, the show has been on the road and has now opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, its only stop in the United States. You have until January 4, 2015 to catch it.

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A. Gardel postcard for Fête du Narcisse in Montreux, Switzerland (1928)

In what makes an interesting side note and a nice addendum to the article on the Diaghilev exhibition in the Winter issue of Performance!, history was made recently when the first known film of Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes company was identified by Victoria & Albert Museum Dance Curator, Jane Pritchard, after she was directed to it by Susan Eastwood of the London Ballet Circle.  The 1928 festival footage, which had been posted on the British Pathé historical archive Web site, includes a brief rehearsal (one hopes) clip, which is believed to show Serge Lifar and the company in a sequence from Les Sylphides. Diaghilev, of course, was adamant about not allowing his company to be filmed, which makes this discovery all the more exciting.

Can spring really be far off now?

In the meantime, you can view the clip for yourselves here.

Image credit:  Digital ID” Fel_018135_RE, ETH Bibliothek Zürich, Bildarchiv

 

Promotional still from “N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz” (2010); photo by Jody Lee Lipes.

So much for my November promise of more frequent postings, but just a quick announcement to let you all know that the Winter issue of the newsletter of the SAA Performing Arts Roundtable is now available online:

http://www.archivists.org/saagroups/performart/newsletter/PArtsNews2010win.pdf

The issue features an article about the Diaghilev exhibition at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, as well as interviews with New York City Ballet dancer Ellen Bar (about her film adaptation of Jerome Robbins’ 1958 ballet, N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz) and Brooklyn Academy of Music archivist Sharon Lerner.