April 2009


And no time to work up a thoughtful post either, but I promise not to quote that P J Harvey song.  Just a quick note to let you know that the Harry Ransom Center recently announced that the Robert De Niro Film Materials Collection is now available to researchers.  You can read the official press release in all its multimedia splendor here.

Something else to look forward to in Austin!

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Performing Arts Roundtable member, Kit Leary, sent in a copy of this lovely promotional poster (which, hopefully, will display correctly here).  In what sounds sure to be an interesting series of programs, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival is simultaneously celebrating both the state’s sesquicentennial and its own historic connection with the 19th century Chautauqua movement. The first of these events is scheduled for this Saturday.  Check it out if you happen to be in the Ashland area or you might consider working one of the others into your summer vacation plans.  Full info is available here.

In what may prove to be our only acknowledgment of May Day activities, we happily point you to the new preservation statement just released by the Technical Committee of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections.  This document contains “recommendations for preserving sound recordings… and transferring sound recordings to an archival digital format.”  Full text may be found by following the link here.

Sheet music cover for "Love's Intense in Tents'

Sheet music cover for "Love's Intense in Tents'

TheaterMania reports today that the Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization will be sold to Imagem Music Group (which last year bought Boosey & Hawkes).   Long time Executive Director of  the RHO, Theodore S. Chapin will be retained in a leadership capacity.  The full press release from Imagem is available here.

Image credit: NYPL Digital Gallery Image ID: g99c214_001

Roy Colmer photograph of door on 56th Street between 6th & 7th Avenue

Roy Colmer photograph of door on 56th Street between 6th & 7th Avenue

As usual, not strictly archival, but, in another one of those end-of-an-era stories that seem to keep cropping up with more and more frequency, today’s New York Times confirms the rumors of the venerable music store’s imminent closure.  You’ll find a good picture of the actual storefront on the Lost City blog.

Image credit: NYPL Digital Gallery Image ID: colmer_233_3014#1

Although this announcement is coming late, there still is a little time left to catch the final performances of Ballet West’s Treasures of the Ballets Russes program, if you happen to be in the Salt Lake City area.  The company has received rave reviews from the Dance Critic of the New York Times, but Ballet West also has been sponsoring a very elaborate festival, which has brought together several local organizations, to celebrate the Ballets Russes centennial since 4 March.  Check out the extensive calendar of events and the Ballet West blog for more information.  Sorry we didn’t notice sooner!

William Gaxton and Constance Carpenter in original Broadway production of "A Connecticut Yankee" (1927).

William Gaxton and Constance Carpenter in original Broadway production of "A Connecticut Yankee" (1927).

Man, is it ever hard to find a decent portrait of a Broadway musical orchestrator (even when the arranger also is a composer), so I guess it’s a fantastic idea that the Library of Congress is presenting a free two-day symposium on the topic in May.  You can read the press release with full information here.  The program is being offered in tandem with the publication of The Sound of Broadway Music: A Book of Orchestrators and Orchestrations by Steven Suskin (Oxford University Press, 2009), a book which clearly fills a gap that sorely needed filling (I’ll have to let you know more about the book some day; the title is not yet even on order at my library).

For the record, the orchestrator for the original Broadway production of A Connecticut Yankee was Roy K. Webb (had to look that up on IBDB)

Image credit: NYPL Digital Gallery Image ID: 485112